Stipendiary Lectureship in English Literature Period 1550 - 1700

Applications are invited for a Stipendiary Lectureship in English Literature, tenable for 2 years, from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2021. 

The post is to provide replacement teaching for the duration of Dr Joseph Moshenska’s Philip Leverhulme Prize. The appointee will be required to provide 8 hours of tutorials for the College per week, averaged over three 8-week terms, and to participate in pastoral care of students and the administration of the subject in the college, including marking college examinations.  

By mutual agreement, this position may be held concurrently with another compatible post.

We expect the appointee to provide tuition and revision classes in the following courses:

  • Final Honour Schools Paper 3:  English Literature 1550 - 1660;
  • Final Honour Schools Paper 4:  English Literature 1660 - 1760;
  • Final Honour Schools Paper 1:  Shakespeare;
  • Undergraduate dissertations that fall within the period 1500 - 1750;
  • A contribution to the first year introductory paper on literary theory.

The stipend will be in the range £18,341-£20,628 p.a. (depending on experience) plus a number of college benefits. The further particulars and application form can be downloaded from http://www.univ.ox.ac.uk, where further details about University College and the courses offered are also available. 

The closing date for applications and the last date for receipt of references direct from referees is 12.00 noon on Monday 18 November 2019. Interviews are expected to take place on Friday 6 December 2019 (subject to confirmation).

Please note that this post would not entitle the successful applicant to apply for a Tier 2 UK Visa, and thus any applicant should ensure that they have the legal right to work in the UK for the period of the lectureship.

University College is an equal opportunities employer. Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates, who are under-represented in academic posts in Oxford.